Friday, April 18, 2008


Rating : 3.0/5
Number of Pages : 340
Reason for Reading : Book Awards Reading Challenge, recommendation from my mum

The story mostly focuses around dizygotic (from two eggs) twins Estha and Rahel who have no last name due to their mother being undecided at the time whether she would use their fathers name or her fathers name. It is set in India mostly and follows their family members when their white cousin Sophie Mol comes to visit them (the three are children at the time) and their uncle, her biological father. She is found drowned in the river after only being with them for a couple of weeks.

The story jumps around quite a lot in time narrating the events leading up to Sophie's arrival, later death and the far reaching consequences over twenty years later for the twins and their family. The storytelling reminded me in style of Margaret Atwood and Salman Rushdie's Midnights Children in the way it wasn't a linear tale and the way the characters were developed. The book it most brought to mind was One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

It tells of love, who you can love, how much and in what way. A strange novel which I can't work out if I enjoyed or not. The final short chapter was beautiful concerning the twins mother, but I didn't like how Roy left the story of the twins. In places it was quite a slow and difficult read, but some of the language really stayed with me. I think this one needs some time dwelling on it before I can properly move on.

8 comments:

Nymeth said...

The story is slow going and jumpy, but the writing just blew me away, and so did the last chapter. I think that one of the reasons why I loved this one so much was the fact that I read it very slowly over the course of two weeks (the first two weeks after moving to Nottingham, so I barely had time to read) It's a book that works better in small doses, I think.

Chris said...

I'll be reading this one soon too. I've heard many people say the same thing as you...they don't know how they feel about it, but they love the end. I've had quite a few novels where I couldn't work out how I felt about them after reading it and it's funny that you compared it to a Marquez book. I didn't know how I felt about Love in the Time of Cholera but after letting it sit for awhile it ended up as one of my favorite books. Looking forward to this one.

Andi said...

I had problems with this one, too. That is, I felt iffy about it when I finished.

Literary Feline said...

I've been looking forward to reading this one for awhile now--and one day I might actually get to it. I was glad to come across your review!

Ladytink_534 said...

Wonder how I've never heard of this? It sounds like it would make for a great reading group book. I'll have to recommend it to the other ladies next month. Thanks!

Melody said...

I'm not sure about this book, because I've read both good and bad reviews about it. I'll probably pick it up some day, but maybe not now though.

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Trish said...

Hmmm--I thought I had posted on this, but I guess not. I really enjoyed Midnight's Children and liked One Hundred Years of Solitude (despite the work it took to read). I have this one on a challenge list and your review makes me want to bump it up--I like books that leave me thinking about it when the cover is closed.